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    What type of heating system do you have?

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    What type of heating system do you have?

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    What type of heating system do you have?

    Post  Admin on Mon Feb 09, 2009 8:03 am

    So what type of heating system do you use? If you're not sure have a read below to find out what you have:

    Types of gas boilers

    Conventional boilers
    Conventional boilers burn fuel in a combustion chamber surrounded by a water jacket. This heats the water, which is then circulated around the heating system. Unfortunately, not all the heat produced by the burning fuel is used to heat the water. Much of it is lost to the surrounding air, and more disappears up the flue. To overcome these inefficiencies, condensing boilers are designed to extract more heat from a given quantity of fuel than is possible from a conventional boiler.

    Condensing boilers
    Condensing boilers are high efficiency boilers that waste almost no heat out of the flue. They are environmentally friendly, but only work in the condensing mode when the working conditions are correct - less than 50% of the radiators must be fitted with thermostatic radiator valves, for example. They also have a shorter than average lifespan and can be very expensive to buy.

    Combination boilers
    Combination boilers provide both instant hot water and central heating, but not at the same time - they are "hot water priority", which means that when hot water is being run there is no heat output to the radiators. This also means they have low water rate, so they can only feed one tap at a time.

    If there isn't a great demand for hot water in your home then combination boilers are ideal, particularly as they do not take up a lot of space. They are also very easy to install and cheap to run. However, they can be expensive to repair and many are designed to be replaced after five years, so you may find that replacing your combination boiler is cheaper than repairing it!
    Other types of heating system

    Low water content boilers and system boilers
    A low water content boiler only holds a small amount of water in its copper heat exchanger, making it very economical to run and small in physical size. They are inexpensive to buy and as they have very few internal components they are very reliable and work very well, however they must be fitted to a fully pumped system.

    System boilers
    A system boiler is like a low water content boiler, but have all the necessary extras built in to fit to a sealed, fully pumped system. They are larger than standard low water content boilers because they have these extra components within the boiler, but are a lot easier to install and look tidier. They are also reliable and cheap to run; however they can be expensive to install and repair.

    Electric storage heaters
    Storage heaters use electricity supplied at a cheaper night time rate to store heat in special heat retaining bricks. These then give out heat slowly and are designed to keep warm for the whole of the following day.

    Electric boilers
    Electric boilers can be used in place of gas boilers in conventional heating systems. They are very compact, light and can be run off cheap rate electricity. Another benefit is that they are completely silent.

    Other options for central heating

    Warm air units
    Warm air units are central heating systems that do not contain any water (i.e. a dry system). Air is warmed directly by the gas as it passes through a simple heat exchanger and then circulated through ducts within the property. They are extremely economical to run and quick to warm up from cold.

    Solid fuel boilers
    Solid fuel heating boilers are mostly limited to back boilers, which are fitted at the back of gas fires, or kitchen ranges. Some solid fuel boilers run the same way as other fuelled boilers and use automatically fed pellets from a hopper situated outside the house. Most solid fuel heating systems are inefficient as they consist of open fires; they also can be messy and require cleaning out once a day at least.

    Oil boilers
    Oil boilers are very efficient but offer less choice of heating systems than gas. In order to run an oil boiler you need a tank installed outside your house, which is usually large and needs to conform to a variety of regulations. If you let your oil boiler run out then you need a heating engineer to re-prime the system before you can get it working again.

    LPG (Liquid Petroleum Gas)
    LPG is alternative to natural gas where it is too expensive or impractical to get natural gas. LPG works in exactly the same way as natural gas but you will need a boiler that can be made compatible via a conversion kit.

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